Relative Risk of Lung Cancer

The National Institute of Health funded a research project to address a critical public health concern about lung cancer risk and the intervention of smoking cessation. The study aimed to investigate lung cancer’s relative risk (RR) and its potential variation between the intervention of smoking cessation and control groups over time. The goal was to understand the impact of interventions of smoking cessation on the risk of lung cancer, which is crucial for informed decision-making and improved health outcomes.

The project used a comprehensive survey dataset, which formed the foundation of the research. The dataset comprised survey responses from 12,000 patients collected over six years, allowing for a longitudinal examination of the RR of lung cancer among both intervention and control groups.

The hypothesis postulated a significant difference in the RR of lung cancer between the intervention of smoking cessation and control groups over time. The analysis utilized a mixed Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), a robust statistical method for examining the effects of both between-subjects factors (intervention vs. control group) and within-subjects factors (changes over time) on a continuous outcome variable (RR of lung cancer). 

The analysis yielded compelling findings […]

By |2024-01-24T15:07:21+00:00January 15th, 2024|Academia, Biostatistics, Hospital|Comments Off on Relative Risk of Lung Cancer

Cancer

Massachusetts General Hospital, a Harvard Medical School teaching hospital, approached AMSTAT consulting to investigate the safety and potential health risks of blood transfusions. Specifically, the hospital aimed to determine whether there was a significant difference in cancer risk among recipients who had undergone blood transfusions. The consulting team utilized a comprehensive survey-based study to achieve this goal, collecting responses from 8,000 patients over two years.

The central hypothesis guiding this research project was as follows: H1: There is a significant difference in cancer risk among recipients based on blood transfusions. The team rigorously tested this hypothesis using a chi-square test, a powerful statistical tool for assessing the association between categorical variables.

Contrary to the initial hypothesis, the research results indicated no statistically significant difference in cancer risk among recipients based on whether they had undergone blood transfusions. This finding showed that blood transfusions were not associated with increased cancer risk in this patient population.

Massachusetts General Hospital derived valuable insights from this research endeavor. By learning that there was no significant effect of blood transfusions on cancer risk, Massachusetts General Hospital gained reassurance regarding the safety of this medical procedure for cancer development. This […]

By |2024-01-24T20:38:53+00:00January 11th, 2024|Biostatistics, Hospital|Comments Off on Cancer

Blood Pressure

Johns Hopkins Medicine recognized the need to understand the potential impact of cancer on their patient’s health, particularly concerning blood pressure. Johns Hopkins Medicine hired our team of statistical consultants to conduct a comprehensive investigation to determine if there were significant differences in blood pressure levels between patients diagnosed with cancer and those without cancer. The purpose of this study was to contribute to the broader understanding of health-related factors associated with cancer diagnoses.

The foundation of this research project was a substantial dataset comprising survey responses from 10,000 patients collected over four years. This dataset provided a comprehensive platform for examining the potential differences in blood pressure levels among patients with and without cancer.

We conducted a t-test to address the research question and evaluate the hypothesis using the statistical software R. A t-test is a powerful statistical method for comparing means between two groups to investigate potential differences in blood pressure levels between patients with and without cancer.

The central hypothesis guiding the research efforts was as follows: H1 – There are significant differences in blood pressure levels between patients with and without cancer. The research rigorously tested this hypothesis, seeking to […]

By |2024-01-24T20:44:03+00:00January 9th, 2024|Biostatistics, Hospital|Comments Off on Blood Pressure
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